Frank Paul

 

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Nothing is Revealed
Frank Paul illustrates the songs of Bob Dylan

Frank Paul was born in Westminster, London in 1984. He studied languages at Cambridge University before becoming a full-time artist. This is his fourth solo exhibition; the first three were held in York, Yaroslavl and London. Two themed books of his drawings have been published, The A-Z of Omens of the Apocalypse and The Anatomist's Handbook, both available from Bohemia Books (www.bohemia-galleries.com). He currently lives and works in London.

"Wry, powerful and passionate observations" Mark Ellen, editor, THE WORD magazine

Mark Ellen introducion to Frank Paul's Nothing is Revealed Exhibition

Press Release

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

Bob Dylan Original Drawings Sold Out

Signed Limited Editions from Nothing is Revealed

Available Now See Below

For Original Drawings Click on Link

The Times Article

 

 

 

Talkin' Bear Mountain Picnic Massacre Blues

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 11" x 14"

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 0120401

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1962; first released on The Bootleg Series 1-3, 1991)

Noel Stookey ("Paul" of Peter, Paul and Mary) comments that he showed Dylan a newspaper article about a picnickers' cruise up the Hudson river which, due to overcrowding caused by the sale of counterfeit tickets, went horribly wrong. To Stookey's astonishment (especially as Dylan was better known as an interpreter than a songwriter at the time) Dylan came back with a song on the subject the very next day.


He tells the story in the form of a drily funny talking blues – a form associated with his early hero, Woody Guthrie, which involves speaking rhythmically over a basic chord progression on the guitar. The narrator, excited about the outing, takes his wife and children to the pier but finds there are six thousand other picnickers queuing up to climb aboard. Chaos ensues as they all pile on, then the ship begins to sink. The narrator loses consciousness and finally wakes up, battered and bedraggled, on the shore. He and his family trudge home and he vows to abstain from all future picnics unless they occur within the safety of his own house. The song ends with a condemnation of swindlers who are prepared to risk other people's wellbeing as long as they can get money out of it.
I have chosen perhaps the most dramatic moment of the song to depict – the sinking of the ship. The idea of drawing a panicking crowd, with each person expressing their panic in their own subtly individual way, very much appealed to me. I portrayed the ship, bound for Bear Mountain, as featuring on its hull a twee image of a bear raising its paw in welcome. As the ship sinks into the water the bear's gesture seems more like one of mocking valediction, a fitting symbol of the ticket sellers' unfeeling attitude towards their customers.


 

Signed Limited Edition Prints Available


Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 11" x 14"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £175

Price Framed: £275 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Ramblin' Gamblin' Willie

Artist: Frank Paul

Title: Ramblin' Gamblin' Willie

Image Size: 11" x 14"

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 0120402

Price: POA

SOLD

All drawings come mounted with a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist Frank Paul


(First recorded 1962; first released on The Bootleg Series 1-3, 1991)

Clinton Heylin describes this ballad as "the first in a long line of Dylan songs celebrating those outside society." The hero is an expert gambler who uses his vast winnings for good causes: helping the needy and supporting his twenty-seven illegitimate children and their mothers. He is finally shot dead by a man he cleaned out in a poker game.

Clinton Heylin, Behind the Shades: The 20th Anniversary Edition (Faber, 2011), p. 89


The scene I chose to illustrate demonstrates Willie's ability to bluff: despite holding a dud hand, he manages to win a fortune from an opponent with a diamond flush. It is seen from the opponent's point of view: his eyes flicker from his cards to Willie's expression, an impenetrable mixture of serenity and roguishness

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 11" x 14"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £175

Price Framed: £275 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Don't Think Twice, it's Alright

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 0120403

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1962; first released on The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, 1963)

The narrator of the song sings a farewell message to the girl he is leaving. Over a lilting background of finger-picked guitar, he laments her shortcomings as a girlfriend which caused the relationship to crumble – only to add at the end of each verse "But don't think twice, it's alright." Apparently written in response to Dylan being himself abandoned by his girlfriend, Suze Rotolo, the song bristles with bitterness concealed beneath a thin veil of casual indifference.


Eleanor Wallace, who penned a song in response to Dylan's entitled "It's Not Alright with Me", comments, "His songs are just begging for answers – his typically masculine point of view needs to counter-balanced by the feminine..." Dylan songs such as this and "It Ain't Me, Babe" (a piece in a similar tone, in which the narrator declares to his girlfriend that he's the wrong man for her, since she desires more devotion from him than he can give) have often been seen as callously misogynist.


My attempt to counterbalance the relentlessly masculine point of view of "Don't Think Twice, It's Alright" shifts the perspective to the abandoned girl. The narrator has already departed, leaving a note on the pillow, and is just visible from the window as a tiny silhouette making his way down the road outside. The girl is yet to wake up and discover his absence. The room she sleeps in accentuates the sense of loss and impending sorrow: it is sparse and desolate, almost forbidding.

Broadside magazine, Issue 41 (1964).

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £275 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Talkin' John Birch Paranoid Blues

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 11" x 14"

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 0120404

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1963; first released on The Bootleg Series 1-3, 1991)

Here Dylan uses the form of the talking blues to satirize the radically right-wing John Birch Society. The narrator is a member of the society who leaves no stone unturned in his obsessive hunt for communists. He looks in the glove compartment of his car, in his toilet bowl and inside his T.V. set (and attributes the electric shock he receives from the latter to a communist conspiracy.) Having concluded that practically everyone and everything is part of the international communist plot, he realizes he has run out of things to investigate. As he cannot conceive of any other activity that would satisfy him he decides to investigate himself, and the song concludes with a nervous "Hope I don't find out anything... great God!"


In my other illustrations to the songs that feature narrators I have not shown the narrator's face. The question of how much Dylan's songs are autobiographical is something he tends to leave unanswered and I felt it was important to preserve this ambiguity. This picture, however, is the exception: it is the only one in the exhibition in which the narrator's face is shown, since the narrator is so clearly separate from Dylan himself. His room, torn apart in his desperate search, can be seen in the background while he stares through a magnifying glass in the foreground, investigating the viewer.

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 11" x 14"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £175

Price Framed: £275 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

The Ballad of Hollis Brown

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 11" x 14"

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 0120405

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1963; first released on The Times They are a-Changin', 1964)

This is the bleak tale of a farmer who, facing financial ruin and the indifference of the world outside, kills his wife, his five children and himself. The final lines – "There's seven people dead on a South Dakota farm/Somewhere in the distance there's seven new people born" – serve as a grim reminder that, as long as society keeps turning its back on the poor, the cycle of despair will continue.


I have depicted Hollis Brown in the midst of his killing spree, a menacing, blood-spattered figure. Throughout the song Dylan empathizes with Brown, with his desperate, futile struggle against the overwhelming forces that grind him down. Without losing that sense of empathy, I have attempted to show Brown's final breakdown in all its horror.


Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 11" x 14"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £175

Price Framed: £275 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Masters of War

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 0120406

Price: POA

SOLD


Masters of War
(First recorded 1963; first released on The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, 1963)

In this searing protest song Dylan denounces those who build weapons and start wars. He accuses them of greed and cowardice as they bask safely in opulence while sending those younger and less fortunate than themselves to kill and be killed.


When this song was first published by Broadside magazine it was accompanied by two drawings by Suze Rotolo, Dylan's girlfriend at the time. The first depicted a towering figure of a man with a knife and fork preparing to carve up the globe while casting a complacently dismissive glance at a hungry, fatherless family, while the second showed a baby's pram converted into a tank.


Though I had not seen Rotolo's drawings at the time I embarked upon my illustration, it is interesting to note that her interpretation (especially as evidenced by her first drawing) has much in common with my own. Firstly, she depicts a single master of war, despite the objects of Dylan's rage being addressed in the plural throughout the song. Secondly, she emphasizes the master of war's wealth and power by depicting him as physically disproportionately large in comparison to his victims. Thirdly, his expression as he wreaks destruction is not one of vicious, maniacal relish but one of calm self-assurance. Admittedly the calm self-assurance in my master of war is portrayed very differently, colder and more forbidding than Rotolo's. Still, it is surprising that a songwriter as notoriously ambiguous as Dylan can provoke such similar responses, and perhaps this should be taken as a testament to the power of his imagery and his sense of character.


An important difference between Rotolo's interpretation and my own, however, is that I have included scenes of war and destruction. I felt that Dylan's lyrics formed such an unremitting, graphic portrayal of the horrors of war that they needed to be depicted in all their monstrosity. Furthermore I wanted the picture to hinge on the powerful contrast between the war zone and the luxury of the master of war's mansion.


I felt that it was important not to depict the master of war as inhuman or utterly evil. I wanted him merely to appear callous and selfish, a man who is content to place his own wealth and comfort above the safety of strangers. In this way I intended the viewer to see him not as a pantomime villain but as a real person, someone who poses just as much danger to the world today as he did in the 1960s.

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £275 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Motorpsycho Nitemare

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 11" x 14"

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 0120407

Price: POA

SOLD


Motorpsycho Nitemare
(First recorded 1964; first released on Another Side of Bob Dylan, 1964)

In this humorous, ramshackle tale, the narrator persuades a suspicious farmer to give him shelter for the night. The narrator is initally entranced by the farmer's daughter, who "looked like she stepped out of La Dolce Vita." However, when she wakes him up in the middle of the night and invites him to take a shower, he realizes she is more reminiscent of Norman Bates, the title character in Hitchcock's Psycho. Terrified for his life, he knows he must escape, yet he cannot do so without breaking his word to the farmer, since he promised him that he would milk the cows in the morning. The only solution, he decides, is to offend the farmer so severely that he throws him out. He cries out, "I like Fidel Castro and his beard!" and the farmer indeed responds by chasing him out with a gun.

Safely free of the farmhouse, the narrator rambles on and expresses his gratitude for the right to freedom of speech, to which he owes his life.
I have drawn the scene where the narrator leaps through the window as the farmer threatens to kill him. The greatest challenge in this drawing was to portray the farmer's daughter as simultaneously resembling Sylvia – the ultra-glamorous heroine of La Dolce Vita – and Norman Bates. I finally resolved to confine the Norman Bates-like aspects of her personality to a knife in her hand and a desperate expression on her face. I positioned a stuffed cow's head on the wall to suggest that she practises Norman Bates' hobby of taxidermy, using the most readily available creatures. In depicting the interior of the farmhouse, I intended to show it as desolate, isolated and intimidating.

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 11" x 14"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £175

Price Framed: £275 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Mr. Tambourine Man

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 0120408

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1964; first released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965)

Here the narrator, wandering through an early morning landscape after a sleepless night, invites the title character to carry him away in the thrall of his song. The lyrics overflow with cryptic, visionary imagery, inspired partly by Rimbaud, partly by Dylan's experience of a Mardi Gras carnival, describing the narrator's rapture as he is swept up by the music. Although the hallucinatory tone and lines like "Take me on a trip upon your magic swirling ship" have led many to read the song as a paean to drug-induced euphoria, Dylan has always denied this interpretation.


The illustration shows Mr. Tambourine Man leading the narrator in a joyous dance. They form faraway silhouettes on a lonely beach while crooked trees cower in the foreground. The viewer is thus placed in the position not of a participant in the revelry but of a distant and detached observer. By this I intend to suggest that the narrator's experience is so intensely personal and so enigmatic that it is impossible to come any closer to sharing it.
I based the landscape loosely on the marshland near the Suffolk coast where I used to go on holidays as a child. The desolate beauty of it has always had a powerful influence on my work and it seemed an appropriate setting for such haunting bliss.

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

On the Road Again

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 0120409

Price: POA

SOLD

On the Road Again
(First recorded 1965; first released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965)

This rib-tickling song features the narrator staying with his girlfriend's family, the zaniest of crackpots. Her mother hides in the refrigerator, her father wears a mask of Napoleon, her grandfather wields a cane that turns into a sword, her grandmother prays to pictures pasted on a board and her uncle is a pickpocket – not to mention her pet monkey and the man in the fireplace whom she calls Santa Claus. But in spite of all this she keeps asking the narrator to move in permanently, an entreaty that leaves him constantly gobsmacked

.
I like to picture the girlfriend (whose personality is barely explored in the song) as very demure and respectable, yet utterly blind to her family's eccentricities. In my imagination she is something of a younger counterpart to the "kindly" aunts in Joseph Kesselring's play Arsenic and Old Lace, who are unable to perceive anything indecent in their penchant for poisoning their guests.


She occupies a place near the foreground of the picture, looking on with a sedate smile while chaos unfolds around her. The narrator is being attacked by the monkey, "Santa Claus" appears dissipated and threatening, and the girl's grandfather swings frantically from the ceiling lamp. I have exaggerated the poses of the girl's family as much as I could without being untrue to the song, thereby providing a comic contrast between them and the girl's show of respectability.


Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Ballad of a Thin Man

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204010

Price: POA

SOLD



(First recorded 1965; first released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965)

It was after a performance of "Ballad of a Thin Man" during a 1966 gig in Manchester that Dylan was infamously heckled with a cry of "Judas!" It is unsurprising that his rendition of this song contributed towards the heckler's view that he had betrayed his folk roots. Its surreal lyrics are delivered over a vigorous electric accompaniment with a howling organ at its core, a far cry from the acoustic ballads that first made his name.


The song centres around Mr Jones, the archetypal conformist, who is inexplicably thrown into a world where weirdness is the norm. Dylan details Mr Jones' horror and confusion with a vicious relish, taunting him with a chorus of "Something is happening but you don't know what it is... do you, Mr Jones?"
The illustration depicts a scene where Mr Jones attends a freak show but is horrified to find he is the one treated as a freak. Although Dylan has little sympathy for his song's protagonist, it is hard not to identify with the helplessness of Mr Jones in such an unfamiliar and hostile environment. When I have been in situations where I have felt painfully out of place I have often cast my mind to Mr Jones' plight, and, in depicting him at his most desperate and vulnerable, I intend to make the viewer feel for him too.

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Like a Rolling Stone

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204011

Price: POA

SOLD

Like a Rolling Stone
(First recorded 1965; first released as a 7'' single and subsequently on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965)

Arguably Dylan's greatest and most influential song, "Like a Rolling Stone" addresses a woman who has fallen from grace. As the electric guitar and organ sear behind him, he contrasts her former lavish lifestyle, when she was surrounded by hangers-on who cared nothing for her, with her current situation, left to fend for herself on the streets. Although most of the song is delivered in a gloating tone that revels in her comeuppance, which she was too naïve and self-absorbed to foresee, the final verse emphasizes that her new life is free from the artificiality of the old.


I was intially hesitant to illustrate a song which had made such a powerful impression on the public consciousness. The prospect of people focusing their attention on this picture above all others, since it corresponded to the most celebrated song, was something that intimidated me. But the lure of the imagery – which, like many Dylan songs of that period, betrays the influence of the circus and the carnival – finally won me over.


The greatest challenge in this illustration was how to combine the imagery of the main character's former luxury with that of her life after falling from grace. The idea of presenting the song as two pictures, a "before" and "after", did not appeal to me, as I wanted to depict the song as a cohesive whole. And her opulence and her destitution are both described in such powerful language that I was reluctant simply to show one or the other.


My solution was to portray the main character, recently cast out onto the streets, as desperately watching the procession she used to lead. Only now can she see that those whom she considered part of her devoted entourage view her with nothing but contempt.

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Desolation Row (part 1)

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204012

Price: POA

SOLD

(First recorded 1965; first released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965)

In this sprawling, rambling, extraordinary eleven-minute epic, Dylan describes a community in the depths of decay. There is no narrative as such, simply an astonishingly varied gallery of frequently grotesque characters and situations. Fellow singer-songwriter Roy Harper calls it "a collection of impressions thrown at a page." Dylan contrasts images of festivity – a circus and a carnival are both in town, while a feast is being prepared – with deeply sinister scenes, in particular the presence of the riot squad, the "agents" and the Superhuman Crew, the latter two being groups who have anyone who knows more than they do rounded up and killed. Literary, historical and biblical characters fill the streets and houses: The Phantom of the Opera, Cain and Abel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Einstein (who is disguised as Robin Hood) and Casanova are just a few of the names on the list.


The first verse ends with "As Lady and I look out tonight/From Desolation Row", and the first person is not used again until the end of the song. In the final verse the narrator receives a letter from someone on the outside, apparently a former inhabitant of Desolation Row enquiring after his welfare and that of former acquaintances. "All these people that you mention," responds the narrator, "Yes, I know them, they're quite lame/I had to rearrange their faces/And give them all another name." The song concludes with the narrator telling the writer not to send him any more letters unless they are posted from Desolation Row. The fact that the narrator is revealed at the end to have a bizarre attachment to Desolation Row in spite of all its menace, unable to bear hearing of the world beyond, is just one more surreal twist in a piece that shows Dylan at the height of his creative energy.


I intend this illustration to be the centrepiece of the exhibition. It is the most ambitious picture I have ever undertaken, a panorama depicting nearly all of the characters mentioned in the song. At the very centre, in the foreground, postcards showing a hanged man are being displayed to the viewer by an unseen salesman. "They're selling postcards of the hanging" is the song's opening line and I chose to highlight this image in particular because I wanted the illustration to be immediately recognizable to anyone who had heard the song.


The aspect of the song I was most eager to capture was its dreamlike, darkly carnivalesque atmosphere. It is a picture where I have concentrated a great deal on the contrast between light and dark, aiming for something akin to the chiaroscuro of a film noir.

1.Mojo magazine, July 2005.

Click Image above

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Desolation Row (part 2)

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204013

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1965; first released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965)

In this sprawling, rambling, extraordinary eleven-minute epic, Dylan describes a community in the depths of decay. There is no narrative as such, simply an astonishingly varied gallery of frequently grotesque characters and situations. Fellow singer-songwriter Roy Harper calls it "a collection of impressions thrown at a page." Dylan contrasts images of festivity – a circus and a carnival are both in town, while a feast is being prepared – with deeply sinister scenes, in particular the presence of the riot squad, the "agents" and the Superhuman Crew, the latter two being groups who have anyone who knows more than they do rounded up and killed. Literary, historical and biblical characters fill the streets and houses: The Phantom of the Opera, Cain and Abel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Einstein (who is disguised as Robin Hood) and Casanova are just a few of the names on the list.


The first verse ends with "As Lady and I look out tonight/From Desolation Row", and the first person is not used again until the end of the song. In the final verse the narrator receives a letter from someone on the outside, apparently a former inhabitant of Desolation Row enquiring after his welfare and that of former acquaintances. "All these people that you mention," responds the narrator, "Yes, I know them, they're quite lame/I had to rearrange their faces/And give them all another name." The song concludes with the narrator telling the writer not to send him any more letters unless they are posted from Desolation Row. The fact that the narrator is revealed at the end to have a bizarre attachment to Desolation Row in spite of all its menace, unable to bear hearing of the world beyond, is just one more surreal twist in a piece that shows Dylan at the height of his creative energy.


I intend this illustration to be the centrepiece of the exhibition. It is the most ambitious picture I have ever undertaken, a panorama depicting nearly all of the characters mentioned in the song. At the very centre, in the foreground, postcards showing a hanged man are being displayed to the viewer by an unseen salesman. "They're selling postcards of the hanging" is the song's opening line and I chose to highlight this image in particular because I wanted the illustration to be immediately recognizable to anyone who had heard the song.


The aspect of the song I was most eager to capture was its dreamlike, darkly carnivalesque atmosphere. It is a picture where I have concentrated a great deal on the contrast between light and dark, aiming for something akin to the chiaroscuro of a film noir.

1.Mojo magazine, July 2005.

Click Image above

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Desolation Row (part 3)

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204014

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1965; first released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965)

In this sprawling, rambling, extraordinary eleven-minute epic, Dylan describes a community in the depths of decay. There is no narrative as such, simply an astonishingly varied gallery of frequently grotesque characters and situations. Fellow singer-songwriter Roy Harper calls it "a collection of impressions thrown at a page." Dylan contrasts images of festivity – a circus and a carnival are both in town, while a feast is being prepared – with deeply sinister scenes, in particular the presence of the riot squad, the "agents" and the Superhuman Crew, the latter two being groups who have anyone who knows more than they do rounded up and killed. Literary, historical and biblical characters fill the streets and houses: The Phantom of the Opera, Cain and Abel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Einstein (who is disguised as Robin Hood) and Casanova are just a few of the names on the list.


The first verse ends with "As Lady and I look out tonight/From Desolation Row", and the first person is not used again until the end of the song. In the final verse the narrator receives a letter from someone on the outside, apparently a former inhabitant of Desolation Row enquiring after his welfare and that of former acquaintances. "All these people that you mention," responds the narrator, "Yes, I know them, they're quite lame/I had to rearrange their faces/And give them all another name." The song concludes with the narrator telling the writer not to send him any more letters unless they are posted from Desolation Row. The fact that the narrator is revealed at the end to have a bizarre attachment to Desolation Row in spite of all its menace, unable to bear hearing of the world beyond, is just one more surreal twist in a piece that shows Dylan at the height of his creative energy.


I intend this illustration to be the centrepiece of the exhibition. It is the most ambitious picture I have ever undertaken, a panorama depicting nearly all of the characters mentioned in the song. At the very centre, in the foreground, postcards showing a hanged man are being displayed to the viewer by an unseen salesman. "They're selling postcards of the hanging" is the song's opening line and I chose to highlight this image in particular because I wanted the illustration to be immediately recognizable to anyone who had heard the song.


The aspect of the song I was most eager to capture was its dreamlike, darkly carnivalesque atmosphere. It is a picture where I have concentrated a great deal on the contrast between light and dark, aiming for something akin to the chiaroscuro of a film noir.

1.Mojo magazine, July 2005.

Click Image above

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints


Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Desolation Row (part 4)

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204015

Price: POA

SOLD

(First recorded 1965; first released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965)

In this sprawling, rambling, extraordinary eleven-minute epic, Dylan describes a community in the depths of decay. There is no narrative as such, simply an astonishingly varied gallery of frequently grotesque characters and situations. Fellow singer-songwriter Roy Harper calls it "a collection of impressions thrown at a page." Dylan contrasts images of festivity – a circus and a carnival are both in town, while a feast is being prepared – with deeply sinister scenes, in particular the presence of the riot squad, the "agents" and the Superhuman Crew, the latter two being groups who have anyone who knows more than they do rounded up and killed. Literary, historical and biblical characters fill the streets and houses: The Phantom of the Opera, Cain and Abel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Einstein (who is disguised as Robin Hood) and Casanova are just a few of the names on the list.


The first verse ends with "As Lady and I look out tonight/From Desolation Row", and the first person is not used again until the end of the song. In the final verse the narrator receives a letter from someone on the outside, apparently a former inhabitant of Desolation Row enquiring after his welfare and that of former acquaintances. "All these people that you mention," responds the narrator, "Yes, I know them, they're quite lame/I had to rearrange their faces/And give them all another name." The song concludes with the narrator telling the writer not to send him any more letters unless they are posted from Desolation Row. The fact that the narrator is revealed at the end to have a bizarre attachment to Desolation Row in spite of all its menace, unable to bear hearing of the world beyond, is just one more surreal twist in a piece that shows Dylan at the height of his creative energy.


I intend this illustration to be the centrepiece of the exhibition. It is the most ambitious picture I have ever undertaken, a panorama depicting nearly all of the characters mentioned in the song. At the very centre, in the foreground, postcards showing a hanged man are being displayed to the viewer by an unseen salesman. "They're selling postcards of the hanging" is the song's opening line and I chose to highlight this image in particular because I wanted the illustration to be immediately recognizable to anyone who had heard the song.


The aspect of the song I was most eager to capture was its dreamlike, darkly carnivalesque atmosphere. It is a picture where I have concentrated a great deal on the contrast between light and dark, aiming for something akin to the chiaroscuro of a film noir.

1.Mojo magazine, July 2005.

Click Image above


Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Desolation Row (part 5)

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204016

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1965; first released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965)

In this sprawling, rambling, extraordinary eleven-minute epic, Dylan describes a community in the depths of decay. There is no narrative as such, simply an astonishingly varied gallery of frequently grotesque characters and situations. Fellow singer-songwriter Roy Harper calls it "a collection of impressions thrown at a page." Dylan contrasts images of festivity – a circus and a carnival are both in town, while a feast is being prepared – with deeply sinister scenes, in particular the presence of the riot squad, the "agents" and the Superhuman Crew, the latter two being groups who have anyone who knows more than they do rounded up and killed. Literary, historical and biblical characters fill the streets and houses: The Phantom of the Opera, Cain and Abel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Einstein (who is disguised as Robin Hood) and Casanova are just a few of the names on the list.


The first verse ends with "As Lady and I look out tonight/From Desolation Row", and the first person is not used again until the end of the song. In the final verse the narrator receives a letter from someone on the outside, apparently a former inhabitant of Desolation Row enquiring after his welfare and that of former acquaintances. "All these people that you mention," responds the narrator, "Yes, I know them, they're quite lame/I had to rearrange their faces/And give them all another name." The song concludes with the narrator telling the writer not to send him any more letters unless they are posted from Desolation Row. The fact that the narrator is revealed at the end to have a bizarre attachment to Desolation Row in spite of all its menace, unable to bear hearing of the world beyond, is just one more surreal twist in a piece that shows Dylan at the height of his creative energy.


I intend this illustration to be the centrepiece of the exhibition. It is the most ambitious picture I have ever undertaken, a panorama depicting nearly all of the characters mentioned in the song. At the very centre, in the foreground, postcards showing a hanged man are being displayed to the viewer by an unseen salesman. "They're selling postcards of the hanging" is the song's opening line and I chose to highlight this image in particular because I wanted the illustration to be immediately recognizable to anyone who had heard the song.


The aspect of the song I was most eager to capture was its dreamlike, darkly carnivalesque atmosphere. It is a picture where I have concentrated a great deal on the contrast between light and dark, aiming for something akin to the chiaroscuro of a film noir.

1.Mojo magazine, July 2005.

Click Image above

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204017

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1966; first released on Blonde on Blonde, 1966)

In this, which ranks among Dylan's funniest songs, the narrator is fixated upon his girlfriend's new hat. He consults his doctor who says it's unhealthy for him to see her, but ignores his advice and calls on her anyway. He is shocked to discover her with the doctor – although his shock stems less from having been betrayed than from the fact that the doctor has dared to don her hat. He subsequently catches her with yet another man and the song ends with his remark that, though she may think this new boyfriend loves her for her money, it's her hat that he really loves her for.
The humour of the song partly derives from the fact that the hat, despite being the focus of so much obsession, is portrayed as ludicrously gaudy and cumbersome. "It balances on your head just like a mattress on a bottle of wine," sings Dylan at one point. The girl, it is suggested, is something of a fashion victim and it is this theme I have chosen to follow up in the illustration. The viewer is given a glimpse into the girl's house, in all its crass glamour, as the narrator catches her with the smarmily flirtatious doctor.

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 11" x 14"

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204018

Price: POA

SOLD


The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest
(First recorded 1967; first released on John Wesley Harding, 1967)

Here Dylan tells the story of Frankie Lee, a gambler who asks for a loan from his best friend Judas Priest. Judas produces some money and Frankie asks to be left alone while he works out how much of it to borrow. Judas takes his leave and, when Frankie asks where he'll find him, he points down the road and says, "Eternity.../Though you may call it paradise." Just after Judas' departure a stranger arrives and tells Frankie that Judas is stranded in a house and is calling for him. Frankie rushes out and finds Judas in front of a magnificent house with "four and twenty windows/And a woman's face in every one." At the sight of the house Frankie becomes wild with ecstasy and rushes inside. He remains there for sixteen days, but on the seventeenth he collapses into Judas' arms and dies of thirst. His funeral is conducted in a tone of silent mockery; the only one who utters a sound is a neighbour boy who mutters, "Nothing is revealed." There is a moral to this tale, Dylan tells us at the song's conclusion. Firstly, you should never be where you don't belong; secondly, you should help carry your neighbour's burden; and thirdly, "Don't go mistaking paradise/for that home across the road."


But in spite of being one of the very few Dylan songs with an explicit moral, "The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest" is a deeply confusing work with many loose ends left untied. In particular, the role of Judas in the drama is very mysterious and it is hard to tell whether he wishes Frankie well or deliberately lures him to his death – although his first name and the way he is described, as a cold man with an off-putting stare, are suggestive of villainy.
The song is held together partly by the absorbing and well-developed characterization of Frankie Lee. Frankie Lee is portrayed as a fragile neurotic who wildly over-reacts to situations. His intense guilt about borrowing money from Judas, his blind panic at hearing that Judas is stranded and his euphoric frenzy when confronted with the house all contribute towards a very extreme character profile I was very keen to illustrate.


The depiction of the highly ambiguous figure of Judas Priest presented me with a problem. I finally decided to portray him as a false prophet, following up on the song's use of biblical imagery. In ancient robes he stands, his cold expression and his command of the situation starkly contrasted with Frankie Lee's reckless, uncontrolled joy. The house of false paradise, complete with a carving of an angel to enhance the deception, bathes everything around it in its radiant glow.

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 11" x 14"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £175

Price Framed: £275 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Quinn, the Eskimo (The Mighty Quinn)

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 11" x 14"

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204019

Price: POA

SOLD


(First recorded 1967; first released on Self Portrait, 1970)

This song, also referred to as "The Mighty Quinn (Quinn the Eskimo)", features a community enveloped in gloom. They are desperately awaiting the title character, a mysterious figure who will turn despair to joy and sleeplessness to rest. At the end of each verse the narrator enthuses about how everything will change once Quinn has arrived, though he has still not come by the end of the song.


The illustration depicts Quinn's long-heralded arrival. It was hard to know how to portray him, since nothing is divulged about his appearance or character, and the means by which he is supposed to bring about joy and contentment is entirely left to the listeners' imagination. I liked to visualize him as the unwitting subject of a folk legend, a rather unassuming individual whose low-key acts of kindness had been exaggerated and embellished until they resembled miracles. It was this image that I decided to follow, portraying Quinn as unaware that his coming has been so eagerly awaited by those who had heard of his rumoured powers and rather confused and alarmed by everyone jumping for joy around him.

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 11" x 14"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £175

Price Framed: £275 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

When I Paint my Masterpiece

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204021

Price: POA

SOLD


When I Paint my Masterpiece
(First recorded 1971; first released on Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits Vol. II, 1971)

Clinton Heylin describes this as a song about "a continuing dearth of inspiration". Penned during one of Dylan's less fertile periods of songwriting, it features a narrator travelling around Europe, apparently in search of his muse. He finds only dissatisfaction, hassle and homesickness, but comforts himself with the thought that everything will be better once he has painted his masterpiece.


The scene from the song that I have chosen to depict shows the narrator among the lions in the Roman Coliseum. As he paints, one of them leaps at him and he is forced to shield his face with his palette. His attempts at painting the lions, each lion in a different style, are crossed out in frustration.


The way in which I have drawn the narrator's painting is more of a comment on my own reaction to a lack of inspiration than Dylan's. In the face of a creative block I have often tried to escape by experimenting with new styles – experiments which tend to feel forced and unsatisfying. I have tried to make both the Coliseum and the lions look as majestic as possible, so as to provide a contrast to the narrator's failed attempts to capture them on canvas.

Clinton Heylin, Behind the Shades: The 20th Anniversary Edition (Faber, 2011), p. 327.

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

 

Isis

Artist: Frank Paul

Image Size: 33.5" x 23" (841 x 594 mm)

Medium: Pen & Ink on Paper

Serial No. BGFPD: 01204020

Price: POA

SOLD

Isis
(First recorded 1975; first released on Desire, 1976)

Dylan co-wrote the words to this song with the lyricist and theatre director Jacques Levy. Influenced no doubt by the turbulence in Dylan's marriage at the time, it deals with a narrator who marries the title character but, unable to hold on to her, rides off to a distant land. There he meets a man who takes him on a mysterious quest through the frozen North. It is only once they have reached a range of icy pyramids that the man reveals the object of the quest: to find a particular corpse which will "bring a good price." Soon, however, the man dies, but the narrator resolves to complete the quest regardless. He locates the casket but it is empty, so he entombs his companion's body and rides back to Isis. There is a brief, casual dialogue between them: when she asks where he's been he merely shrugs, "No place special." He tells her he is content to stay so long as that's OK with her, and then the song concludes with a verse in which he describes his passion for her.


The prospect of drawing a bizarre landscape of pyramids embedded in ice was something that very much appealed to me. I intended the juxtaposition of the various elements in the scene – the pyramids in the background, the disposal of the body, the narrator's pony wistfully eyeing the viewer through the bitter cold – to be striking but harmonious, just as the song is a harmonious fusion of very disparate parts.

 

 

Signed Limited Edition Prints



Signed By: Artist Frank Paul
Edition: 35 Prints World Wide
Dimensions: Image 16" x 24"
Atelier: Bohemia Fine Art
Condition: New Mint Condition
Medium: Archival Giclee on 310gsm Hahnemule German Etching Paper

Price Mounted: £210

Price Framed: £325 with conservation glass

For more infomation contact the gallery on Tel: +(44)01482 881 882 Mobile: 07880 747454

Email: sheana@bohemia-galleries.com

 

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